Topic: working "out of the box"

I frequently read this phrase in many posts.
Could someone explain its meaning ?
By the way, I apologize for my computer n00biism inclusive-or poor understanding of English.

Last edited by UltimaPratica (2008-03-31 07:23:14)

Re: working "out of the box"

UltimaPratica wrote:

Could someone explain its meaning ?

Outside of conventional thinking and/or understanding.  Coming up with a new method of characterizing a problem or formulating a new solution not tried before.

Re: working "out of the box"

Thank you for your answer ocicat.
Now, in a more dedicated way :
I am wishing to install "Blender" (open source 3D content creation suite) on my FreeBSD box.
Considering the installation instructions, I read :
"...Provided the Blender binary is in the original extracted directory, Blender will run straight out of the box. No system libraries or system preferences are altered..."
Should I understand from this that the method given for installing (there is only one : unpacking a tarball to the location of my choice) is not a "conventional" one with regards to FreeBSD ?
If so, what would a more conventional one be ?

Re: working "out of the box"

In that case, what they mean is it should work as if you bought pre-packaged software.  You open the box, install it, and it should work straight away. 

ocicat's definition relates to an old game of 9 dots in the form of a square.  It was used as a test of puzzle solving, abstract reasoning, logic, and all that jazz.  The idea is to connect all 9 dots with straight lines without lifting your pencil off the paper.  Once you know the solution, you'll understand the phrase "thinking outside the box".

Re: working "out of the box"

You can install blender from the ports collection:
cd /usr/ports/graphics/blender && make install clean

Or as a package:
pkg_add -r blender

See chapter 4 of the FreeBSD handbook:
http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO885 … ports.html

edit: My 100th post! PAAAARTTYYYY!

Last edited by Carpetsmoker (2008-03-31 16:34:25)

Trust me, I know what I'm doing.

Re: working "out of the box"

drhowarddrfine wrote:

Once you know the solution, you'll understand the phrase "thinking outside the box".

Thank you for your exhaustive and understandable explanation. It makes actually more sense to me now.
I would even feel more intelligent...!

Carpetsmoker wrote:

You can install blender from the ports collection

Thank you too ! Even if I feel now more stupid than ever !
I had initially looked for blender in the ports collection but only in the cad subdirectory !
Never imagined it could be in the graphics one !
Silly is'nt it ?

Re: working "out of the box"

generally, when people say "out of the box," they are referring to something working with minimal user configuration. so for example, if you install an OS and all of your peripherals (like printers or digital cameras) work without installing drivers, the OS works with the peripherals "out of the box." because the OS comes straight out of its "box" and immediately works with no configuration.

if someone says "outside of the box," they are probably referring to what ocicat explained.

Re: working "out of the box"

Carpetsmoker wrote:

You can install blender from the ports collection

Thank you too ! Even if I feel now more stupid than ever !
I had initially looked for blender in the ports collection but only in the cad subdirectory !
Never imagined it could be in the graphics one !
Silly is'nt it ?

Search works better.
http://www.freshports.org/search.php

Or you can use:
cd /usr/ports && make search name=blender

Trust me, I know what I'm doing.

Re: working "out of the box"

# cd /usr/ports
# make quicksearch name=blender

quicksearch only outputs the name of the port, the path to the port, and the description of the port.  It's much more terse, and quicker to use.

Last edited by phoenix (2008-04-03 04:07:10)

Re: working "out of the box"

There's also Maxlor's own psearch which has been added to the ports-mgmt group of ports.

cd /usr/ports/ports-mgmt/psearch
make install clean

Its only dependency is python.  The advantage is that you don't have to cd to /usr/ports before typing it.  Then you can do

psearch blender

Like quicksearch it only gives the name, path and description of the port.  I prefer it to doing a cd to /usr/ports and typing make quicksearch name=whatever.  Maxlor's psearch can be used anywhere on the system, you don't have to cd to /usr/ports first. 

Not that that's a major issue, but I just find it easier to type psearch when I think of something than I do to cd to ports and type the quicksearch thingie.

<@andre> i would be so much more efficient if i wasn't so stupid

Re: working "out of the box"

Maxlor rocks big_smile

<wintellect> NetBSD users are smart enough to accept that there's no 3D support tongue

Re: working "out of the box"

http://discont.in/uous/code/opsearch  - something i use on openbsd tongue

Keep Smiling