Topic: installation of freebsd

hello again, (if I'm getting to that annoying stage yet, sorry. I tend to annoy people when I learn something new by asking a million questions (sometimes out of order).

  anyways, my question is: Is this a good setup or should I take something out and put something in? (this is for my pc at home)

/ 512MB
SWAP 2GB
/var 2GB
/tmp 1GB
/usr 15GB
/rest 93GB   - used for any files  (i want to create a file server / ftp (for when I'm not at home))



I had something similiar at school, with the exception of the 120GB hard drive. My teacher said something about not really needing so much space for /tmp or something, but the book said something different, so I went half and half.

Last edited by madlarkin (2007-10-12 04:20:37)

Nobody is innocent, there are merely varying degrees of guilt.

Re: installation of freebsd

madlarkin wrote:

/ 512MB
SWAP 2GB
/var 2GB
/tmp 1GB
/usr 15GB
/rest 93GB

You setup is good, you can decrease / to 128-256mb,  I currently use 38MB od / space.
About /tmp, currently I use 512mb, used at most 5%, You can also go the Solaris way here and mount /tmp in SWAP in /etc/rc.conf:

tmpmfs="YES"
tmpsize="512m"
tmpmfs_flags="-S -M" # read about these flags in man mdmfs
"religions, worst damnation of mankind"
[color=Blue]Linux is not UNIX! Face it! It is not an insult. It is fact: GNU is a recursive acronym for

Re: installation of freebsd

Wouldn't it be better to go with a relatively large /tmp? Compilation of Openoffice e.g. takes about 8G.

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Re: installation of freebsd

Oliver wrote:

Wouldn't it be better to go with a relatively large /tmp? Compilation of Openoffice e.g. takes about 8G.

Compilation uses /usr/ports/*/*/work dirs by default, so big /tmp is not even touched here.

Good choice is to use WRKDIRPREFIX= ${PORTSDIR}/obj in /etc/make.conf, so all ports will be compiled in /usr/ports/obj/* and then you can mount there temporary some ${BIG_DIR} for openoffice compilation.

"religions, worst damnation of mankind"
[color=Blue]Linux is not UNIX! Face it! It is not an insult. It is fact: GNU is a recursive acronym for

Re: installation of freebsd

ok. Thank you. Andre on the IRC said something about having the swap but not needing it as I have 2GB of ram.

Nobody is innocent, there are merely varying degrees of guilt.

Re: installation of freebsd

vermaden wrote:

.About /tmp, currently I use 512mb, used at most 5%, You can also go the Solaris way here and mount /tmp in SWAP in /etc/rc.conf:

What's the advantage of mounting /tmp in swap space?  It's my understanding that /tmp is used frequently wouldn't mounting it in swap space be slow?

Re: installation of freebsd

kce wrote:

What's the advantage of mounting /tmp in swap space?  It's my understanding that /tmp is used frequently wouldn't mounting it in swap space be slow?

If sufficient memory is present, mounting /tmp as a memory file system (mfs) can free up disk space, & given that /tmp is erased upon startup in OpenBSD, nothing is lost by mounting it in memory.  Most, if not all of my OpenBSD systems utilize less than 512MB of RAM, so any additional memory is simply sitting dormant.  Because of this, upon one of my next installations, I'm considering allocating no swap space at all.  /tm is already mounted as mfs on some systems.

How much swap can be monitored through swapctl(8) or top(1), however if no swap is ever used, disk space can be better utilized.  You can, however, make an argument that swap space is insurance, but ultimately, the decision should be based on the system's usage, how much disk space is available, & personal preference.

Re: installation of freebsd

kce wrote:
vermaden wrote:

.About /tmp, currently I use 512mb, used at most 5%, You can also go the Solaris way here and mount /tmp in SWAP in /etc/rc.conf:

What's the advantage of mounting /tmp in swap space?  It's my understanding that /tmp is used frequently wouldn't mounting it in swap space be slow?

SWAP space on a BSD system is usually a partition on the harddisk for swapping data in physical RAM with a location on a harddisk for efficiency purposes. Mounting tmp under swap will offer no speed increase if swap is merely harddisk space (unless it's on a faster harddisk wink )

However, make a portion of your RAM a RAMdisk (a pseudo harddrive in RAM) and the access speed will increase incredibly as no actual harddisk interaction will occur wink

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Re: installation of freebsd

That sollution was not to gain speed, but to use (for most of the time almost free) SWAP space and do not use another partition for /tmp

Also /tmp keeps lot(s) of small files so its load will be very similar to SWAP load.

"religions, worst damnation of mankind"
[color=Blue]Linux is not UNIX! Face it! It is not an insult. It is fact: GNU is a recursive acronym for